Seroquel

Dr. L called back the other day – Rick left an urgent message. Apparently he’d been out of the office for about a week and no one thought to tell us when we were leaving messages at the front desk.

He called in 25mg tabs of Seroquel (generic = quetiapine). We were told to give him 1/2 a tablet the first three days, then increase to a full tablet – taken at bedtime.

Seroquel is an “atypical anti-psychotic.” It’s used to treat schizophrenia, depression in bi-polar patients, and “to treat or prevent episodes of mania.”  The initial effect is drowsiness – which is why it’s given at bedtime – and then it’s supposed to help with the meltdowns through the next day.

As usual, I did a lot of reading.  There isn’t a lot of information on prescribing Seroquel to children, but that seems to be the case with many meds.  The worst I could find was that it caused nightmares in some and weight gain in most.  (Colin needs to gain weight – he’s incredibly skinny, even though he eats plenty.  He’s in constant movement, so he burns far more than he cares to eat. Being a picky eater doesn’t help!)  Many people compared it to Abilify saying that Seroquel helped with the anxiety in ways that Abilify didn’t – another plus for us.

Wednesday night, we gave him the 1/2 pill along with a now reduced  dose of Clonidine (0.1mg – down from 0.2mg). 

He got downright paranoid.  He kept getting up, telling us there were storms coming (yes, there were clouds outside and some lightning far off in the distance). At one point, he made me come look out his window at the cloud that “looked like a head.”  He just kept getting up. He was so nervous!  At one point, he came out and said, “I can’t breathe anymore and I can’t talk anymore.”  I said, “Honey, you are breathing…and you’re talking to me right now, okay?”  He went, “Oh. Okay,” and went back to bed.

He popped back up around 10:30pm – just when I thought I was in the clear! – and used the bathroom.  He went right back to bed, though, and didn’t get up until 6am. (And he slept in his bed!)

Last night… I honestly just screwed up. I completely forgot about the 1/2 pill to start and handed him a whole one.  I realized what I’d done entirely too late. So he was given 25mg of Seroquel and 0.1mg of Clonidine.

About 30 minutes later, he became incredibly drowsy.  It was almost 8pm (bedtime) anyhow, so I said, “Colin, why don’t you go lay down? You look very sleepy.”

He gave a half-hearted, “I don’t wanna go to bed yet, though,” and then let us lead him to bed without any further discussion.  He laid down and passed right out.

He slept until 6:10am.  That’s over 10 hours of sleep. I think the last time he slept that long, he was sick.  (That’s usually how you can tell he doesn’t feel well – he gets tired and still.)

We didn’t notice much of a difference in him yesterday – it will be interesting to see if the full dose helps at all today.  He woke up bright-eyed and bushy-tailed – his usual spunky, early morning self!  He got in trouble for messing with the dogs and was sent to his room while I made breakfast.  He pouted, but didn’t cry about it.  Otherwise, it was a wonderful morning.  We’ll see how this goes.

Our sitter made it through her first full week!  I handed her a fat wad of cash last night and her eyes lit up. 🙂  I don’t think she’s going to quit on us.  She seems to genuinely like our crazy kids and she’s come up with some great ideas to help keep them in line. Best idea so far?  A schedule.  She thought of that on her own.  Her brother has ADHD as well (though, she admits, far less extreme than Colin) and she understands better than most, although she still doesn’t quite grasp the autism aspect. The only downside I can see so far is that our house is COVERED IN GLITTER.  Covered.  Especially Colin’s room, since he snuck the container of glitter they’d been using for art projects into his room and shook it all over the place.  Our house is very sparkly now!

In other news, my stepdad’s mother passed away yesterday.  She was 102 years old.  Her funeral is on Tuesday.  I’m not sure if we should tell the kids – I don’t know how to.  And honestly, they know her, but she wasn’t a vital part of their lives.  If they never saw her again, I don’t know that they would notice.  Robbie might.  I could see him ask Pop (my stepdad) one day where his mom is.  But even that’s a very slim possibility.  I just don’t know.  Kay is going to come over early on Tuesday to watch the boys so we can go to the funeral without them.

I’m not sad for her.  I’m sad for my stepdad because I know he will miss her.  But she lived a very full, wonderful life.  These last two years have been the worst for her – she had to be moved out of her nursing home apartment and into a full time care room. She wasn’t allowed to leave the room without an escort.  Her few joys were basically taken away – she couldn’t go play cards with her friends when she felt like it, she couldn’t even go to the mailbox on her own.  She went from a cute one bedroom apartment with a balcony and her plants and knick knacks to a hospital room.  I think she was ready to go.

I’m sad for my mom, too, because I think her mother-in-law gave her some sense of purpose.  Mom was the most likely to take her to church or the zoo or out to the park.  If it wasn’t for my mom, the adventures would have been very rare. 

Rest in peace, Lucille.

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2 responses to “Seroquel

  1. My fingers are crossed in hopes that this combination of meds will be the ticket. …about the glitter…I have it everywhere in my house too. It seems everything my daughter wears has some form of it. ..Also, sending my condolences to you and your family. It’s a difficult decision to make about having the kids “involved” with this phase of life. It may be a great teaching experiences since they have no strong attachment, but then why even burden them with this knowledge. They are so young. This is something I have been struggling with. Let us know how it works out.

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