Tag Archives: Education

Too excited to wait!

Just a quick post because I’m bursting at the seams with pride and excitement!

I missed a call at lunch. Listening to the voicemail got me all teary-eyed.  It was a message from the gifted & talented coordinator at our kids’ elementary school.

Robbie’s been in first grade for less than 8 full days and they want to know if I’d like him tested for the gifted & talented program!   I’m still a little awestruck.

Standard procedure is to test new students in the Spring – Fall testing is for the children that were in kindergarten at the same school.  Robbie’s teacher recognized him as one of the children she felt could be tested for the program now.  Paperwork was due 8/31!  The coordinator gave us until tomorrow to fill out the forms and get them over.  I printed them out immediately and had them ready to go.  I was only waiting on Rick to wake up so I could tell him.  I felt like I should at least let him know before setting it up!

His first text to me was, “I’m in favor of having him tested ASAP, btw.”  🙂

Best part is that he’s already in the class with the 1st grade GT teacher, so he will get to stay in that classroom. And our elementary school is the GT school for the district, so he won’t have to change schools next year, either.

I’m so excited!  He definitely needs to be challenged and he’s well past the coursework they’re doing now, so this would be wonderful for him.

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Otto Learns About His Medicine

Last night, I read Otto Learns About His Medicine to Robbie and Ryan. 

Colin was sitting on the floor nearby, putting a puzzle together.  He rarely sits with us when we read together, unless I’m reading Where the Sidewalk Ends (that one is my favorite, too).

Ryan and Robbie are always very excited when a new book turns up.  And this one’s bright red, so it was hard to miss that Mom was holding something new when they finished with their showers.

Before I started, I said, “While we’re reading this book, I want you to think about whether or not this story reminds you of someone you know, okay?  When I’m done, we can ask questions about everything and talk for a bit.”

The story tells of a little car named Otto (whose last name is “Mobile”).  Otto’s engine runs too fast.  He gets distracted by every little noise in the classroom. He speaks out of turn too much in class. He can’t hold still and sometimes runs into other cars without meaning to.  At one point, he ran off from a gas station while still getting filled up because he saw a friend with new racing stripes – gas wound up going everywhere. 

Otto’s teacher suggests to Otto’s parents that they take him to see a “mechanic” for a check up.  The mechanic decides he should go to another mechanic for more help.  They explain that the different mechanics, family members and teachers are part of the “pit crew” that is there to help Otto.  The new mechanic (specialist) suggests that another helpful member of the pit crew might be medicine.  He explains that medicine can’t make you learn or focus or behave.  It is there to help Otto – just as the rest of his pit crew is also there to help him.  They even discuss that sometimes medicine can have side effects and that this special medicine may make it hard to sleep and make Otto not as hungry. [I was a little surprised at the mention of side effects! But I feel they did a good job explaining what they meant.]

When the book was over, I asked the boys if the story reminded them of anyone.  I had a feeling I knew how this might go.

Robbie said, “That sounds kinda like me!  Like when I get distracted at school!”

I was worried he would relate to the book.

I said, “You’re able to sit down and focus when you want to, though, right?” He admitted he could.  “Does this book make you think of anyone else?”

Ryan quietly said, “It’s like Colin, right Mom?”

I told him he was exactly right – the little car Otto was a lot like Colin.

When I said that, Colin perked up – suddenly he wanted to know what was going on.

“This book is about a car that’s just like you, Colin!” Robbie was so excited. “It’s motor runs too fast, just like yours does sometimes! And he takes medicine like you do to help!”

Rick chimed in, “What part of your body is like a motor?  Can you think of a body part that’s similar to a motor in a car?”

The boys thought for a moment, but couldn’t come up with anything.

“How about the brain?” Rick asked.  They all agreed – a brain is like a motor!

Rick explained that sometimes Colin’s brain runs too fast and it makes things very difficult for him.  His brain tells his body to do and say things even when he knows he shouldn’t.  We explained that we’re trying a new medicine that can help.

“Can medicine make Colin behave?” I asked.

“Noooo!” answered the boys.  “It just helps him so he can try to make good choices!”  (I was really glad the book explained this aspect of medicine. Before, Robbie kept thinking that the different doctors and medicine were going to somehow be a cure-all for Colin – I think he’s been disappointed that we kept saying we were trying different things and yet Colin was still…well.. Colin.)

“Remember that part in the book where Otto couldn’t sit still?” I asked.  “Remember how he ran into the other cars and they got mad?  What did they do?”

“They pushed him back!” said Robbie.

“Is that what they should have done?” I asked.

“Nooo!  He didn’t mean to run into them – it was an accident. He couldn’t help it because his engine was running too fast!” Robbie answered.

“That’s right.  And sometimes Colin does things he can’t help, too. We need to remember that.”  I hugged my boys.  I think this book has helped some things about ADHD click for them.

Meanwhile, Colin had the book in his hands and was looking through the pictures.  “I want to read it now. Can you read it, Dad?”  It was already after 8pm – bedtime, for sure.  Rick promised Colin he’d sit down with him tomorrow and read it with him.

I’m thankful for this book.  It’s a bit wordy, but not too bad.  The only thing I’d change are the illustrations.  The cars stand up on their back wheels and start to look a little creepy during the “mechanic” sections.  I think the car metaphor worked well because our boys are big fans of the Cars movies and understand what a pit crew is. 

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Colin is definitely having issues sleeping.  Last night, he was still up at 9:30pm and I couldn’t keep my own eyes open any longer.  I was reading in bed and kept nodding off.  I finally called it quits around 10pm and shut off the light.

At around 1:30am, Chloe started pacing.  When she does that, it usually means she really has to use the bathroom. If you don’t get up, you’ll find a present in the house later.  I decided I’d take the dogs out.

When I walked into the living room, I saw Colin was asleep on the couch.  I’d bet he came out there as soon as he thought I was asleep.  I woke him up and sent him back to his room.  My guess is he’s sleeping on the couch more than I care to admit – that’s probably how he’s waking up within seconds of me in the morning. 

Thankfully, once he was in bed, he crashed pretty hard.  He was the last one up this morning at around 6:10am. 

The 20mg twice/day of Adderall has done wonders for him at school – two green days so far this week!  But it’s making sleep very difficult.  I feel bad for him.  Not sure what we can do to help.  I’m going to call the doc today and see what he thinks.  We have an appointment on Friday, too, but maybe he can suggest something in the meanwhile.

Blog Spotlight: Life With Clay

I found this blog today and had to share.

Life With Clay

In his entry Wrestling with the tough questions, the author links to an article he wrote for Philly.com. What a wonderful read.  This boy’s story is inspiring.

I always love reading about parents of children near my son’s age, but lately I’ve found myself looking for blogs from parents of older spectrum kids.  A glimpse into the future, perhaps – a sign of encouragement.  Our journeys are all so different, of course.  Unlike Clay, Colin can speak fairly well. But I still have concerns about the future.

Please share your favorite blogs on Autism, if you will. I’m always hungry for more.